morse key
2009-12-12 10:07
Dear Mr:Kelly

Iam not used to key board to operate CW. I like to use straight key.Please tell me how to go about it.
Bye
Sam
Re: morse key
2009-12-12 16:25
Hello Sam
This was posted in another thread. I hope it helps you:
Jerry - N1TKO

I posted this earlier in another section on the forum.

A morse key can be connected via the serial port to send CW.
If you don't have a serial port (as most new PCs don't), you can buy a high speed serial port card to insert into a spare slot. You then connect your key directly to the serial port using an old serial mouse (cut off mouse and just use the cable).
Alternatively, buy a usb to serial port adapter and attach the mouse cable to that.

Once you have the key connected, you have to use a keying program to get the signal into Hamsphere.
There are quite a few free programs around. ie. EHOCW at www.f8eho.net, CWCOMM at www.mrx.com.au or Dahdidah at [qsonet.com]

I think they all have instructions on how to get the key to work via the serial port.

Once it is all up and running you key Hamsphere using the PTT and send CW. Don't forget to turn off the PTT when your transmission is completed.

You have to use DSB not "CW Mode" as you can't use a key in CW Mode. This has been confirmed by Kelly and the option cannot be implemented in future releases.

Hope it helps you.

73 ar ee
Bruce
Re: morse key
2009-12-13 02:22
Hi Jerry

Thank you for all the details. Will try to fix it up soon.

Merry xmas and happy new year.

73s
De sam
Season's greetings
2009-12-17 15:16
Happy new year and merry xmas to one and all at hamsphere.
Bye
Sam
Re: morse key
2009-12-23 21:25
Hi Sam,
Just connect your straight key direct to a key sounder ie oscillator, so that when you press your key you get sound,
then just go to tx by pressing f1
then as you key your audio from the oscillator you will have the sound go directly over the air as you key untill you end and re,press f1 to go to recieve, simple and easy
73 ray
G0EML
Re: morse key
2009-12-26 15:05
...or you can connect the oscillator directly to your computer, if you dare. :D











The 9V battery is lot more than enough, 3V might be sufficient.
Re: morse key
2009-12-26 15:49
Hello Tamas
Once you built your home-brew oscillator, did you connect it directly to your serial port?? Or are you sending through your microphone?
I'm just curious how you connected it for those who are reading this post. Also, would you be kind enough to explain the project? (parts, ect...)
I'll bet there are a few folks on here that may want to try to build one.

Good job Tamas!
I'll look for you on the bands for a CW chat! The way the keyboard works with CW now has spoiled me!!! hi hi

73
Jerry - N1TKO
Re: morse key
2009-12-26 18:26
Hello Jerry,

I connected it to the line-in port of my sound card. It works well, but it produces loud clicks. That may not be a problem in case of Hamsphere, because - as far as I know - it filters the input thoroughly, so there should be no splatter.

I use the morse key to switch the oscillator on and off, pretty rude I know. I tried to switch the signal while the oscillator was running continuosly, but the click became even worse, which is very understandable. ;)

I will experiment with it further, and post the results. Until than, here is how the circuit works:

Basicly it's a twin-t oscillator: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/g0xan/twin-t.htm

I changed a few values of certain parts, because I only had those in my junkbox. :P

The schematic is above on that piece of white paper. :) The transistor is a BC548B, but probably almost anything will fit. Use common sense. :)

Each of the "18K" resistors were replaced with a 15K resistor and an 5K trimmer, so the frequency can be adjusted slightly.

I left the 10K pot out, so the 100nF capacitor (ah! those really small numbers) connects right to the two wires of the audio cable (left and right channel).

The other values are the same and should be readable on the foto, I write them here just in case:

10nF capacitors (2 pcs.)
18K resistors (each replaced with 15K and 5K trimmer)
4.7K resistor (Oh, I replaced this one too with a 5.1K one)
47nF capacitor (this one is OK)
100nF capacitor
10K potmeter (I did not use this one, you probably should.)

There is no buffering, so the circuit cannot drive headphones, but it still can be connected to the line-in, or to the microphone. Again, there is no buffering, so the frequency is very dependent on the load impedance, so the circuit produces different sound on different machines.

I did not check the waveform it creates, but I suspect that it is somewhat distorted, because there is no amplitude control either.

So, a todo list:

1. Add buffer stage.
2. Use permanently working oscillator and signal switching and filtering.
3. Add amplitude control, if necessary (might be not, if there's little distortion and the filter is doing a good job)
Re: morse key
2009-12-26 18:42
Great Tamas!
Thanks for the explanation. The main thing is that it works!!(tu)
It is small projects like this that creates interest and I'm sure a few folks will build one. Building "kit" projects was very popular years ago. Now everything works out of a box. Elecraft makes some great kits for Ham Radio. I was thinking about saving up and buying a KX-1..... I'm not sure. Pretty expensive but it sure would be fun building one. And the K3 HF rig fro Elecraft would be awesome to build.... but again, very expensive.
Anyhow, thanks again for the explanation on your project!
Take care and we'll see you on the bands.
73
Jerry - N1TKO
Re: morse key
2009-12-26 23:17
I examined the output of the circuit with an oscilloscope program called xoscope (for linux). The produced signal was (well, looked like) a nice 900Hz sine wave, so probably no (further) amplitude control is necessary.

However, after the device left unkeyed for a couple of minutes, at the first keypress it produces a deeper, gradually heightening whistle. This is becouse some capacitor needs to be charged through a large resistor, and this initial charging modulates the frequency. This is another prove that oscillator on/off keying is a bad, bad idea. :)

Cup is half full: only two problems to solve (buffering and switching/filtering). :)
Re: morse key
2009-12-27 16:28
Finally I assembled a filter stage without buffering and it worked fine. So this is version 1.0 :)



The project assembled and packaged into a plexiglas case:



Enjoy.

73 de Tamas
Re: morse key
2009-12-27 17:56
A piece of homebrew equipment, a straight key -- that's hamming!

Very cool, Tamas. Thanks!

Very 73,

Tom
Re: morse key
2009-12-28 21:41
Ahhhh.

The key comes between the leftmost 100nF capacitor and the 10K resistor. :D

Hm... looking at my little tweeter-box, the key is connected to the wrong place (_after_ the filter...) this explains, why it's still clicking... :D:D:D

..and thak you Tom, :)

73 de Tamas

Update: I corrected the circuit, and the clicks are gone. :)
Re: morse key
2009-12-28 23:08
Nice!! Lets work some CW Tamas....?
Drop me a line to set up a sked.
73
Jerry - N1TKO
Re: morse key
2011-02-25 11:29
Nice project!
Can we use a 5V for powering on instead 9V
73s
Michael - LZ1MOB
Re: morse key
2012-06-15 18:30
Another option is to wire a 1/4" socket into a usb mouse, wired across the contacts for the left button. If you use your regular mouse to locate the pointer on the PTT, you can then use the key to operate it. Not tried this on Hamsphere yet, because I've dissembled my one, but it worked on x-IRC.

--
Phil Culmer
Surgeon Lieutenant (Senior Grade), RMN
HMS Pegasus
QTH IO93sf m7pcc@culmer.org.uk
Re: morse key
2012-11-18 11:35
N1TK0 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Hello Sam
> This was posted in another thread. I hope it
> helps you:
> Jerry - N1TKO
>
> I posted this earlier in another section on the
> forum.
>
> A morse key can be connected via the serial port
> to send CW.
> If you don't have a serial port (as most new PCs
> don't), you can buy a high speed serial port card
> to insert into a spare slot. You then connect your
> key directly to the serial port using an old
> serial mouse (cut off mouse and just use the
> cable).
> Alternatively, buy a usb to serial port adapter
> and attach the mouse cable to that.
>
> Once you have the key connected, you have to use a
> keying program to get the signal into Hamsphere.
> There are quite a few free programs around. ie.
> EHOCW at www.f8eho.net, CWCOMM at www.mrx.com.au
> or Dahdidah at
>
> I think they all have instructions on how to get
> the key to work via the serial port.
>
> Once it is all up and running you key Hamsphere
> using the PTT and send CW. Don't forget to turn
> off the PTT when your transmission is completed.
>
> You have to use DSB not "CW Mode" as you can't use
> a key in CW Mode. This has been confirmed by Kelly
> and the option cannot be implemented in future
> releases.
>
> Hope it helps you.
>
> 73 ar ee
CWTYPE пользутесь-http://www.dxsoft.com/ru/products/
Re: morse key
2012-11-18 11:37
N1TK0 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Great Tamas!
> Thanks for the explanation. The main thing is
> that it works!!(tu)
> It is small projects like this that creates
> interest and I'm sure a few folks will build one.
> Building "kit" projects was very popular years
> ago. Now everything works out of a box. Elecraft
> makes some great kits for Ham Radio. I was
> thinking about saving up and buying a KX-1.....
> I'm not sure. Pretty expensive but it sure would
> be fun building one. And the K3 HF rig fro
> Elecraft would be awesome to build.... but again,
> very expensive.
> Anyhow, thanks again for the explanation on your
> project!
> Take care and we'll see you on the bands.
> 73
> Jerry - N1TKO


Я работаю в CW ---http://www.dxsoft.com/ru/products/
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